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The Benedict Labre House

(Monuments)

Address : 308 Young St.
Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

The Benedict Labre House
308 Young Street

Constructed between 1870-1880, this row of tenements displays a Breton and Scottish style with authentic mansard roofs and paired doors. Originally part of a larger block of homes that were destroyed during the 1960s and 1980s, two of the three remaining buildings now house The Benedict Labre House (BLH), a day centre for the homeless established by Tony Walsh in 1952 (Ville de Montréal, Service de la mise en valeur du territoire et du patrimoine, Division patrimoine et toponymie, 2007). This Catholic outreach centre originally provided succor to the residents of Griffintown, which was, at the time, predominantly Irish and working-class neighbourhood. Today, BLH serves a largely itinerant population of men and women from diverse ethnic, linguistic and economic backgrounds.




The CN Control Station and the Wellington Lift Bridge

(Monuments)

Address : 1230 Smith St.
Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

The CN Control Station and
the Wellington Lift Bridge
1230 Smith Street

This three story concrete building was built in 1931 as a control post for train traffic and for the newly built Canadian National Railway double lift bridge. All the original working parts to control the lift bridge still exist inside the building. Unfortunately there is very little existing documentation
available on this building’s history. Although the lift bridge was decommissioned in 1966 and the control station has long been abandoned, the station is considered an important historical building and the City of Montreal, along with the developer Devimco, has plans to restore and repurpose the
site, possibly as a bicycle rest station to serve the bicycle traffic along the canal.




The Darling Brothers Foundry Ltd.

(Monuments)

Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

The Darling Brothers
Foundry Ltd.
745 Ottawa Street

This building was the second foundry built by the Darling Brothers. The first, located to the east of this site, was built in 1889. The company was very successful from the start and continued to add buildings over the years, including a third foundry, now demolished. Between 1851 and 1890, the number of foundries in Griffintown went from 8 to 20. In 1991 the Darling Brothers Foundry closed its doors and has since been repurposed as an art gallery and restaurant (Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network).




The Dow Brewery

(Monuments)

Address : 333 Rue Peel
Postal code/ZIP : H3C 2G7
Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

The Dow Brewery
984 – 1000 Notre-Dame, 333 Peel Street

The former brewery complex consists of many buildings. On Montfort we find the oldest building at the site; formerly a refrigerated warehouse, it is built in the vernacular style with ‘porteur’ walls in stone (Maître d’oeuvre de l’histoire, 2006 pp. 121 - 123). The brewery’s large warehouse and fermention buildings were constructed between 1924 and 1929 the length of Colborne Street (now Peel), between St. Joseph (now Notre-Dame) and William (Hanna, 2007). In 1929, a garage for the brewery’s delivery vehicles, designed by architect Louis-Auguste Amos (1869-1948), was erected at the southeast corner of William and Peel. In 1930-1931 an administration building, designed by Harold Lea Fetherstonhaugh (1887-1971), was built at 984-990 Notre-Dame. Constructed in the art deco style, this building, which served as head office for The National Breweries Limited consortium, boasts a rich interior decor of various marbles and precious woods, bronze and brass and an exterior ornamented with pilasters and bas reliefs showing elements and symbols of the brewing process and of the consortium members (Hanna, 2007). The first brewery at this location, owned by Thomas Dunn, moved to Montreal from La Prairie in 1808 (Sneath, 2001 p. 30). In 1920 Dunn hired recent immigrant William Dow, son of a Scottish brewmaster, to assist with the brewing (Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online: Dow, William). By 1829, Dow was Dunn’s partner and the brewery name was changed to Dunn & Dow (Sneath, 2001 p. 30). Dow’s younger brother Andrew eventually joined the company and, after Dunn’s death, the name was changed to William Dow and Company and became Molson’s main competitor. By the mid-1960s the Dow brand was outselling every other beer in the province and their slogans, such as: “Wouldn’t a Dow go good now?”, “Now for a Dow” or “Dis donc Dow” were ubiquitous. Then, in 1966, as a result of poor public relations handling of the tainted beer scandal in which 16 deaths were attributed to the use of cobalt as a heading agent, Dow’s popularity dropped overnight and the company suffered a decline in sales from which it never recovered (Sneath, 2001 pp. 184-185). In 1968, the Dow name, by now representing a national consortium, was changed to La brasserie O’Keefe du Québec Ltée (Sneath, 2001 p. 98). O’Keefe closed the plant in 1991 (Sneath, 2001 p. 409) and in 1996, École de technologie supérieure (ETS) recycled the O’Keefe building at the southwest corner of Peel and Notre-Dame into an engineering school and is currently at work repurposing portions of the buildings on the east side of Peel into a Centre of Innovation for the technology sector (ETS, 2010). Sadly, while renovating to accomodate the new Centre of Innovation, ETS had the top portion of the brewery’s chimney removed: where it used to read “Dow Brewery”, it has now been reduced to “Brewery”. According to local property owner Harvey Lev (Personal communication), Normand Proulx at the borough’s permit department asserts it will be restored. The garage at Peel and William was renovated in 2003 and currently houses the offices of the Board of Montréal Museum Directors as well as ETS’s AÉROÉTS and Centre de technologie thermique.