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Police Station No.7

(Monuments)

Address : 219 Rue Young
Postal code/ZIP : H3C 2G7
Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

Police Station No.7
217 – 219 Young Street

The 1890 Lovell Directory situates Police Station No.7 at 67 Young Street with James Clark as seargent and Frank Gray and Michael Fennell as acting seargents. We know the building was already there in 1879 because records indicate that Susan Kennedy was first held at the police station on Young following her arrest for the sensational decapitation of Mary Gallagher (Hustak, 2005) and Hanna (2007) places the date of construction at 1875. Centrally located to serve the community, this three-story brick building boasts a stone facade and a mansard roof. At the time, the use of stone was generally reserved for public buildings, such as St. Ann’s Church, the presbytery and the police station (Ville de Montréal, Service de la mise en valeur du territoire et du patrimoine, Division patrimoine et toponymie, 2007). Although the roof and cornices of this building have been preserved, it is in need of some restoration and, given its historical and architectural significance, it certainly merits protection and a heritage designation (Maître d’oeuvre de l’histoire, 2006 p. 124).




St. Ann’s Church

(Monuments)

Address : 101 Rue Murray
Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

St. Ann’s Church
Corner of Mountain and Wellington Streets

St. Ann’s Church was the heart of Griffintown’s Irish Catholic community. Built in 1854, it was Montreal’s second English Catholic church after St. Patrick’s (1847). Whereas the “lace-curtain” Irish around St. Patrick’s consisted of merchants, skilled workers and professionals, St. Ann’s parishioners were known as “shanty Irish” -- unskilled labourers employed in factories, in construction or on the docks. The population of Griffintown began declining after World War II and, in the early 1960s, the municipality decided that Griffintown no longer had a future as a place for people to live. It was rezoned as industrial commercial in 1963 and, in 1967, approximately a third of the neighbourhood was demolished to make way for the Bonaventure Expressway. Having lost most of its parishioners, St. Ann’s Church was torn down in 1970. A few years ago the City of Montreal ‘restored’ the foundations of the church and today the site is a park with benches instead of pews (Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network).




The Benedict Labre House

(Monuments)

Address : 308 Young St.
Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

The Benedict Labre House
308 Young Street

Constructed between 1870-1880, this row of tenements displays a Breton and Scottish style with authentic mansard roofs and paired doors. Originally part of a larger block of homes that were destroyed during the 1960s and 1980s, two of the three remaining buildings now house The Benedict Labre House (BLH), a day centre for the homeless established by Tony Walsh in 1952 (Ville de Montréal, Service de la mise en valeur du territoire et du patrimoine, Division patrimoine et toponymie, 2007). This Catholic outreach centre originally provided succor to the residents of Griffintown, which was, at the time, predominantly Irish and working-class neighbourhood. Today, BLH serves a largely itinerant population of men and women from diverse ethnic, linguistic and economic backgrounds.




The CN Control Station and the Wellington Lift Bridge

(Monuments)

Address : 1230 Smith St.
Town/Suburb/City : Montreal
State/County/Province : Quebec
Country : Canada
      
Description : 

The CN Control Station and
the Wellington Lift Bridge
1230 Smith Street

This three story concrete building was built in 1931 as a control post for train traffic and for the newly built Canadian National Railway double lift bridge. All the original working parts to control the lift bridge still exist inside the building. Unfortunately there is very little existing documentation
available on this building’s history. Although the lift bridge was decommissioned in 1966 and the control station has long been abandoned, the station is considered an important historical building and the City of Montreal, along with the developer Devimco, has plans to restore and repurpose the
site, possibly as a bicycle rest station to serve the bicycle traffic along the canal.



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